Nor­mal­ly, I am against crowd-sourc­ing. That is because the cre­ator usu­al­ly nev­er gets any cred­it, much less one red cent, from all the work they do. How­ev­er, challenge.gov and Chal­lenge­Post, both offer incen­tive for the crowd-sourc­ing projects they put forth. Whether it is mon­ey or prizes, I have already won a T-shirt for one project I took part in, there is some­thing tan­gi­ble you can get out of the project. So, I am not adverse to it. I am not mate­ri­al­is­tic, but get­ting feed­back aside from a half-heart­ed “thanks” is nice.

Now, I doubt I’ll ever get rich from doing any of these projects, but it def­i­nite­ly gives me some­thing to do to keep my skills sharp when my work runs out. Writ­ing, as well as being my pro­fes­sion, start­ed off as a hob­by. It has since turned into a bit of an obses­sion. How­ev­er, unlike oth­er obses­sions, this one doesn’t have me dis­re­gard­ing per­son­al hygiene or any­thing of the sort. I just like the instant grat­i­fi­ca­tion of see­ing the results of my work imme­di­ate­ly. That’s prob­a­bly a lit­tle nar­cis­sis­tic, but I am okay with that. I don’t have a long atten­tion span, so I like imme­di­ate feed­back.

I think what I am try­ing to say is crowd-sourc­ing isn’t, nec­es­sar­i­ly, a bad thing. Just don’t expect to get free swag on the back of some­one with­out putting some­thing for­ward in the first place. That’s just dirty pool, and can only work so many times before you only get what you put into it.

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